I appreciate that this is hard for you. (Other ways of saying ‘understand’)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​
understand_1
Following on from last week’s post on near-synonyms, we’re looking this week at various ways of saying that we understand things. Starting with a very common near-synonym, the verb ‘realize’ is often used for talking about the state of understanding and knowing things: I realize this is difficult for you. It is also used to say that we startto understand something: As she was speaking I suddenly realized that we’d met before. The verb ‘grasp’ also means ‘understand’ but is used to mean ‘to succeed in understanding something’ and is often used to talk about understanding difficult things: It was quite a high-level talk but I think I managed to grasp the main points./She couldn’t seem to grasp the concept. (The noun ‘grasp’ is also used: His grasp of grammar is very impressive for a seven-year-old.)

A phrase which is used…

View original post 409 more words

Advertisements

There I was, minding my own business… (The language of anecdotes)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​​
languageofanecdotes
We all like to tell anecdotes – to share with our friends short, funny stories about things that we have done or seen. Of course, the subject matter of our stories varies hugely, from chance meetings with unusual characters to disasters in the kitchen. However, the phrases that we use to tell these stories are often quite similar. This week we’re looking at anecdote phrases and seeing how they are used in the telling of tales.

Of course, to start with, we need to introduce our anecdote, (which often relates to a topic that is already being discussed). To do this, we often use phrases such as these:

Did I ever tell you about the time I invited Al’s boss round for dinner?

I’ll never forget the time I got locked in a public toilet in Portland.

That reminds me of the time I gave a…

View original post 346 more words

There I was, minding my own business… (The language of anecdotes)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​​
languageofanecdotes
We all like to tell anecdotes – to share with our friends short, funny stories about things that we have done or seen. Of course, the subject matter of our stories varies hugely, from chance meetings with unusual characters to disasters in the kitchen. However, the phrases that we use to tell these stories are often quite similar. This week we’re looking at anecdote phrases and seeing how they are used in the telling of tales.

Of course, to start with, we need to introduce our anecdote, (which often relates to a topic that is already being discussed). To do this, we often use phrases such as these:

Did I ever tell you about the time I invited Al’s boss round for dinner?

I’ll never forget the time I got locked in a public toilet in Portland.

That reminds me of the time I gave a…

View original post 346 more words

By the way, did you want tickets for the match on Saturday? Conversational expressions

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​

conversationLearners of English often want to know expressions which they can use to manage their conversations – words and phrases that, for example, connect ideas or introduce new ideas. Some of these expressions do not appear in dictionaries so we thought it might be helpful to take a look at this area here.

A conversation between two or more people usually focuses for a certain amount of time on one topic so when a speaker wants to start a new topic, they often use a phrase to introduce it. By the way is probably the most common way of doing this:

View original post 406 more words

By the way, did you want tickets for the match on Saturday? Conversational expressions

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​

conversationLearners of English often want to know expressions which they can use to manage their conversations – words and phrases that, for example, connect ideas or introduce new ideas. Some of these expressions do not appear in dictionaries so we thought it might be helpful to take a look at this area here.

A conversation between two or more people usually focuses for a certain amount of time on one topic so when a speaker wants to start a new topic, they often use a phrase to introduce it. By the way is probably the most common way of doing this:

View original post 406 more words