Go ahead! (Phrasal verbs with ‘go’)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​​​​
go ahead
Every few weeks, we focus on phrasal verbs that are formed with a particular verb. This week, we’re looking at phrasal verbs that start with the verb ‘go’. As ever, we present a range of the most useful and common phrasal verbs.

Some of the most common ‘go’ phrasal verbs are easy to understand because the ‘go’ part of the phrase has its usual meaning, which is ‘to move or travel somewhere’. When ‘go’ in a phrasal verb has its usual meaning, the other part, which is the particle, (away, off, out, etc.) also has its regular meaning. For this set of phrasal verbs, it is easy to work out what they mean:

She went away (= left) for a few days.

When are you going back(=returning) to Paris?

A pink sports car went by(=passed).

I looked in the shop…

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I’m so sorry! (The language of apologizing)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​​​​
apologizing
From time to time, we all have to apologize (= say we are sorry for something we have done). This post looks at the language of saying sorry and also considers the way that people respond when someone says sorry.

First, then, the apology itself. The phrase ‘I’m sorry’ can be made stronger and more sincere by adding ‘so‘ or ‘really‘: I’m so sorry we’re late./I’m really sorry about last night. Note that people who are apologizing often say a little more at this point, either to explain why they did what they did, or to say why they are sorry:

I’m reallysorry I said that. I was just so upset at the time.

I’m so sorry I said those things. I know I really upset you.

Often the phrase should have (or shouldn’t have) is used here:

I’m so sorry…

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You remind me of someone… (Words for remembering)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

by Kate Woodford​​​​
remembering
Do you have a good memory? Is your memory so good, it’s photographic, allowing you to remember precise things in exact detail? Perhaps your memory is good at particular things. You might have a good memory forfaces or a good memory fornames. Or you may not be so lucky. You might be forgetful, (often forgetting things). Worse, you may have a memory/mind like a sieve. (A sieve is a piece of kitchen equipment with a lot of little holes in it!) Whether your memory is good or bad, you will find yourself using words and phrases to describe the process of remembering. This post aims to increase your word power in this area.

Let’s start with useful words and phrases for remembering. Two other ways of saying ‘remember’ arerecall and recollect: I seem to recall she was staying…

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