It’s just so difficult! How to use the word ‘just’

Just is a really annoying word for learners of English! It’s very common and we use it in lots of different situations, often with quite different meanings. In this post, I will try to explain some of the most common ways in which we use it – not only on its own, but as a… Continue reading It’s just so difficult! How to use the word ‘just’

Advertisements

4 Reasons Why Highly Intelligent People Are Happier with Less Socialization

The idea that a high degree of socialization and intelligence don’t go together seems not just to be a popular perception but a fact. A study aimed at finding the correlation between evolution and socialization found that ‘more intelligent individuals experience lower life satisfaction with more frequent socialization’. The researchers posited that the reason for… Continue reading 4 Reasons Why Highly Intelligent People Are Happier with Less Socialization

Divulging and disclosing (The language of giving information)

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

Bobiko/Moment/GettyImages

by Kate Woodford

We tell each other things all the time, whether it’s our news, some important information or just interesting facts. This week we’re focusing on the language that we use to describe giving information.

Starting with a really useful phrasal verb, if you pass on a message or a piece of news that someone has told you, you tell it to someone else:

Remember to pass on my message to Ted.

No one passed the news on to me.

The verb relay means the same: He heard the announcement and immediately relayed the news to his colleagues.

Sometimes we pass on information to lots of people. The verb spread is often used for this. It frequently comes before the nouns gossip andrumour:

I hope you’re not spreading gossip, Alice!

He’d apparently been spreading rumours about her around the school.

Spread’ is also used…

View original post 283 more words

The life and soul of the party (How we behave at social events)

How do your friends behave at social events? Is one of them the life and soul of the party, chatting, laughing and dancing with everyone? Or perhaps you know a party pooper, someone who spoils other people’s enjoyment by refusing to join in and have fun. This week we’re looking at language that relates to… Continue reading The life and soul of the party (How we behave at social events)

I’m hoping to become a vet: talking about our future lives

About Words - Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog

Topic Images Inc./Topic Images/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

It is common to ask young people about their hopes and plans for the future. This post looks at some words and phrases you can use to respond to such questions.

We often use the general phrases I’m hoping/planning to … or I’d like to …:

I’m hoping to become a vet.

I’d like to live abroad for a few years.

View original post 370 more words